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Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Rabbit with Mustard Sauce ~ Bending My Ways


it's been a rough summer for me this year. it has been hard to smile as of late and yet thru it all, i have been laughing my hardest. friends are the best balm - for anything. i have been feeling uninspired in the kitchen, with yarn, with crafts. i even had an ethan allen type scoff at my attempt at refurbishing my desk, which i have yet to unveil... a project i may not even show, just due to the sneer. good lord, cry me a fucking river, will you?

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i bought rabbit again recently at the farmer's market, this time freshly butchered the night before. but like the last times, i couldn't bear to look at the skinned bunny, i cringed when the butcher lady handed me the 2lb bag of $13 carcass. and at home, i couldn't chop up the body into pieces. i could not bend my mind around the fact that this flesh had been a furry animal ~ probably living happily on a farm, just 24 hours prior. i did take up the duty of browning the meat tho, something i had always relegated to nuria. small steps. i just have to learn to bend before i break.

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Rabbit with Mustard Sauce
adapted from the Sharper Your Knife, the Less You Cry by Kathleen Flinn

dish can be made with bone-in chicken thighs.

about 2 lbs rabbit pieces
coarse salt and black pepper
1 Tbl dried thyme
AP flour, for sprinkling
3 Tbl olive oil
dijon mustard
1 Tbl butter
2 medium onions, finely diced
2 cloves garlic, chopped
1/3 cup of brandy* (i used Brugal Rum)
2/3 cup chicken stock


preheat oven to 350F. Sprinkle meat with salt, pepper and dried thyme. dredge lightly in flour, shaking off excess. in a large dutch oven, heat the oil over med-high heat. brown pieces on all sides, in batches if needed. remove meat from pan and drail oil. generously top each piece of meat with the dijon mustard, set aside.

in the same pot, melt butter. add the onions and cook until translucent. add garlic. add the brandy* and chicken stock, simmer until slightly reduced. Return rabbit pieces to the pan. Cover and cook for about 45 minutes in the oven. (tho on the stove top would suffice too, i'd think)

i served this with some rice, drizzling the sauce over the meat and rice.

verdict: this is nuria's fave rabbit dish. it was good, i dug the touch of dijon mustard.

today's song: Brandi Carlile, Before It Breaks

I can make my own mistakes/Let it bend before it breaks...

it will get better. i promise.

3 comments:

  1. i can definitely understand where you are - i've been going through similar lows myself recently. friends really are the best medicine during tough times.

    as for figuring out how to reconcile living animals with the foods we eat, one of the worst (but also in some ways the best) experiences i had with that was in culinary school. we were making stuffed lobster. to kill it, you actually had to slice it open with your chef's knife. i can't tell you how traumatizing that was for me. i had never killed anything before in my life (minus the accidental ant on the sidewalk) - and i haven't been able to since. (one of the many reasons why i chose not to become a professional chef!) but i do have a different understanding about food from that experience, sustainability, and what it means to really provide for yourself.

    it's been several years since the "lobster day", but i may still need to open a lobster rescue home...

    ReplyDelete
  2. sarah,
    i've only ever cooked lobster once and it was quite traumatic but i wasn't as squimish then as i am with rabbit meat. i think this is a fear that i have to tackle in small doses. i guess one could just say to just not eat rabbit meat... but i like meat and i'm not going to stop.

    ReplyDelete
  3. i can definitely understand where you are - i've been going through similar lows myself recently. friends really are the best medicine during tough times.

    as for figuring out how to reconcile living animals with the foods we eat, one of the worst (but also in some ways the best) experiences i had with that was in culinary school. we were making stuffed lobster. to kill it, you actually had to slice it open with your chef's knife. i can't tell you how traumatizing that was for me. i had never killed anything before in my life (minus the accidental ant on the sidewalk) - and i haven't been able to since. (one of the many reasons why i chose not to become a professional chef!) but i do have a different understanding about food from that experience, sustainability, and what it means to really provide for yourself.

    it's been several years since the "lobster day", but i may still need to open a lobster rescue home...

    ReplyDelete