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Monday, March 2, 2009

Recipes to Rival: Homemade Ricotta Cheese

To my Dearest Recipe to Rivalers,

i apologize for being a day late. it's a been a helluva weekend, i had my sister and cousin over and i just couldn't bear to be on the computer plugging away about my monthly challenges. i only had the daring bakers up on time because i had posted it in advance.

anyway, this month's challenge was wonderful, something i'd always wanted to try: homemade cheese, specifically Ricotta Cheese. it was hosted by Lauren of I'll Eat You and KatBoro of A Good Appetite. i quartered the recipe, using 4 cups of whole milk and 1 cup of buttermilk.

i had grand plans to make a lovely spinach ricotta cheese souffle (mixing the cheese, with an egg and some spinach, sectioned into cute ramekins, baked in the oven for about 25 minutes...) but somehow i promptly forgot i had put them in the oven. i sat around with my sister and cousin, hanging out and watching TV and completely blanked on having anything in the oven. by the time i walked back into the kitchen, i remembered and they were brown and entirely overcooked. boo! thankfully, i hadn't made a lot and it's not like i can't whip up another small batch of ricotta cheese, now that i know how completely easy it is to create!

Till next month,
love and sunshine,
Angry Asian

ricotta cheese



(click Read More for the recipe and another pic)

Fresh Ricotta

1 gallon milk (you can use 1 percent on up, remember that the more fat in the milk, the more cheese it will yield.)
1 quart buttermilk
-cheesecloth (a good, tightly woven one, not the kind you buy at the supermarket)- If you don't have one of these, you can get by with a slotted spoon, but you may lose some of the cheese.
-a thermometer (mine is for oil and candy)

Place buttermilk and milk in a pot, heat on med-low heat until it reaches 185 degrees F.

It will begin to separate into curds and whey. Be sure to stir occasionally to make sure no curds stick to the bottom and burn. You will see that as the temperature approaches 185, the whey becomes clearer as the curds coagulate more.

Pour the curds into a cheesecloth lined colander. Tie the ends of the cheesecloth together and hang for 10-15 minutes. Remove from cheesecloth and place in an airtight container.

Voila! Cheese!

ricotta cheese 2



14 comments:

  1. Ciao ! You are right it was very easy !! But I'm so lucky to have the real sheep one that probably will wait for the desert (with a cow) island !!!

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  2. Your ricotta looks great! Too bad about your souffle, at least you had a great time with your family.

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  3. I would say I had never ever done anything like that but I would be lying through my teeth. It is too bad, it sounded like a great recipe. I love the picture of your cheese.

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  4. I love ricotta, but I had no idea you could make it yourself! (Mentally noting to buy a cheesecloth. Need one. Officially.)

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  5. Thanks so much for this! I have long wanted to find a source for organic ricotta and now I have one: me! Thanks again.

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  6. Sounds wonderful. This will work with pasteurized milk? Can't wait to try.

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  7. natalia, debyi, and temperance - thanks ladies!

    shannalee - i bought my cheesecloth from whole foods. i think a slotted spoon would work just as effectively, really.

    shazza - hope you enjoy it!

    butteryum - pasteurized is fine but NOT ultra-pasteurized. "Ultra pasteurization heats the milk too much, and de natures the proteins that form curds. You will not get cheese from ultra pasteurized milk."

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  8. I've never done this but you make it look so easy. Thanks for the post!
    Michelle
    http://oneordinaryday.wordpress.com/

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  9. wow. i did not know you could make your own ricotta. i'm so going to do this someday. i need to get a cheesecloth first.

    thanks lan, you're an inspiration!

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  10. michelle, i swear, it is really easy to make, not at all intimidating.

    trish, i found cheesecloth at whole foods, i couldn't find it at my local grocery store. fold it over a few times so that it catchs all the cheese. let me know how it goes! :)

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  11. wow. i did not know you could make your own ricotta. i'm so going to do this someday. i need to get a cheesecloth first.

    thanks lan, you're an inspiration!

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  12. natalia, debyi, and temperance - thanks ladies!

    shannalee - i bought my cheesecloth from whole foods. i think a slotted spoon would work just as effectively, really.

    shazza - hope you enjoy it!

    butteryum - pasteurized is fine but NOT ultra-pasteurized. "Ultra pasteurization heats the milk too much, and de natures the proteins that form curds. You will not get cheese from ultra pasteurized milk."

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  13. I've never done this but you make it look so easy. Thanks for the post!
    Michelle
    http://oneordinaryday.wordpress.com/

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  14. This looks just like the cheese my mom used to make. I made it a little differently. I usually make it with a buttermilk/milk mixture by last week I decided to experiment and try other souring agents. I posted my results on a blog, together with my recipe. http://cuceesprouts.com/2011/04/homemade-farmers-cheese/

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